The PADSIS Blog

If you were a PADSIS member you would be able to view this content. Membership starts at just £49.Click to join PADSISThe Intoxicating Place of Risk Taking in School Sport

Posted: Friday, 13 October 2017

Adventure has always been part of being human.  From the early explorers who discovered that the world wasn’t as flat as it seemed, through to the invention of the Gap year.  Discovery, surprise and uncertainty have always held appeal.  Unpredictability is always potentially exciting or terrifying – and has been since dinosaurs roamed the planet. This human inclination is repressed by a risk assessment culture.  The principle of foreseeing and denying risk is at odds with the fundamental appeal of novelty and discovery.  It might be sensible and functional, but it opposes the human desire for excitement. A risk averse world needs sports, games and adventure activities to fulfil this need.  But there is a fundamental difference between sport which reflects adventure, and that which is itself risk averse.  The teams and players that captured the heart and imagination  throughout history are not those that were efficient and error free.  Though this approach might win competitive success...

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If you were a PADSIS member you would be able to view this content. Membership starts at just £49.Click to join PADSIS“They Have Been Telling us the Answer for Years: ‘Please Sir, Can We Have a Game?’”

Posted: Thursday, 05 October 2017

The industry of sport coaching is a recently evolved one.  Before the 1970s, few teams had anything that could be described as a coach. Other than to transport them to the game. Indeed, many would have been offended by the implication of the concept.  Perhaps more shocking, cones had not been invented.  Any rudimentary team organisation was overseen by the captain. “Game Plans” and “Systems” were in their absolute infancy. Fifty years have seen a huge cultural shift.  No self respecting team would be without a coach, whatever its performance level.  Player dependency is absolute: coach centricity is unquestioned.  At all levels of every game, the expectation of all is that the coach gives the instructions, and the players follow them.  This is not just before the game. It has become the industry norm that the coach maintains a constant commentary of advice and observation (to players and officials) throughout the game.  Research identifies that some coaches shout for 80% of the match...

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If you were a PADSIS member you would be able to view this content. Membership starts at just £49.Click to join PADSISCollaborating to Compete: the Conundrum of Improving Competitive Standards in School Sport

Posted: Friday, 29 September 2017

Schools have competed against each other in sport since rules were agreed in games.  They have also inferred their own status relative to the teams they play against.  The fixture programme is not simply an organisational expedient of local teams; it has always implied something about both schools.  The ancient public schools were reluctant to recognise the schools which were established in the late nineteenth century by granting them matches. Sport is essentially a collaboration between schools to mutual advantage.  No school can have a satisfactory competition programme without help from opponents who are prepared to operate teams in the same sports.  Both sides allocate significant resources,  providing facilities, transport and appropriately prepared and accompanied teams.  The players and parents of both sides benefit from an improved experience.  When schools invest in the arms race of facility development, their opponents also benefit, as access is shared every match day. ...

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If you were a PADSIS member you would be able to view this content. Membership starts at just £49.Click to join PADSISParents in Sport: Do you want to Witness Joy or Victory?

Posted: Friday, 22 September 2017

The great majority of parents like to see their offspring participate in sports or physical activity.  Rarer is the carer who sees no value in this.  The reasons why they approve of this type of involvement vary, though they are infrequently thought-out beyond the vague conviction that it’s somehow “good” for the kids.  What parents want their kids to get out of their experience of youth sport will determine the environment they choose to put them into, and the achievements that they wish to celebrate and encourage. Research is quite clear what children enjoy in sport.  Having fun, being with friends, getting better at something, the excitement of competition: these are fairly consistent conclusions.  All these regularly appear above the desire to win trophies.  Whether the influential adults who determine the youth sports environment reflect these priorities is crucial.  It is the parents and coaches who establish the prevailing culture. They determine whether or not this is in line...

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